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Syllabus support

Industrial Technology: Stage 5 Syllabus

View relevant syllabus extracts

© Board of Studies NSW for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2008. Please note that the most up-to-date version of this document can be found at http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/syllabus_sc/#industrialtech

Engineering Studies: Stage 6 syllabus

View relevant syllabus extracts

© Board of Studies NSW for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2008. Please note that the most up-to-date version of this document can be found at http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/syllabus_hsc/syllabus2000_liste.html

History: Stage 5 Mandatory Course
– relevant syllabus extracts

© Board of Studies NSW for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2008. Please note that the most up-to-date version of this document can be found at http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/syllabus_hsc/?path=/go/7-10/hsie/history&

Topic 3 Australia between the Wars

This topic offers students CHOICE in their study of specific aspects of Australia’s social, cultural and political development between the wars, including the experiences of individuals and groups and defining moments in Australia’s inter-war history.

Topics may be chosen from only the 1920s or the 1930s or may be a combination of both decades.

Inquiry questions

  • What were the differing experiences of various groups during the interwar period?
  • What was the contribution and significance of at least ONE Australian, ONE important event and ONE political development during the interwar period?

Outcomes

Throughout this topic, students work towards all outcomes, with particular focus on those listed below.

A student:

5.1 explains social, political and cultural developments and events and evaluates their impact on Australian life
5.4 sequences major historical events to show an understanding of continuity, change and causation
5.5 identifies, comprehends and evaluates historical sources
5.6 uses sources appropriately in an historical inquiry
5.7 explains different contexts, perspectives and interpretations of the past
5.8 locates, selects and organises relevant historical information from a number of sources, including ICT, to undertake historical inquiry.

Working Historically

Historical skills to be integrated into this topic:

  • sequence events within the time period
  • identify, comprehend and evaluate a range of sources
  • identify perspectives of different individuals or groups
  • plan historical research to suit the purpose of an inquiry
  • select appropriate forms of communication for specific purposes.

ICT skills appropriate for this topic may include:

  • identify, comprehend and evaluate a range of sources, including ICT.

Suggested Site Studies include:

  • a local site from the inter-war period
  • a streetscape from the period.

 

Students learn about:

Students learn to:

At least ONE study to be chosen from EACH of Sections A, B, C and D in EITHER the 1920s AND/OR the 1930s

1920s

Section A: Group

  • the varying experiences of at least ONE of the following:
    • returned soldiers
    • women
    • workers

1930s

  • the varying experiences of at least ONE of the following:
    • the unemployed
    • the wealthy
    • stolen children

 

  • describe the experiences of the chosen group/s

Section B: Individual

  • the contribution and significance of at least ONE significant individual from the 1920s eg:
    • Rev John Flynn
    • Dame Nellie Melba
    • Sir Charles Kingsford-Smith

 

  • the contribution and significance of at least ONE significant individual from the 1930s eg:
    • Sir Donald Bradman
    • Margaret Preston
    • Nancy Bird Walton
    • Roy Rene
    • Sir Isaac Isaacs

 

  • outline the achievements of the chosen individual
  • explain the contribution and significance of the chosen individual to Australian history

Section C: Event

  • the significance of at least ONE important event eg:
    • construction of Canberra
    • the Conniston massacre
    • introduction of ‘talkies’

 

  • the significance of at least ONE important event eg:
    • the death of Phar Lap
    • opening of Sydney Harbour Bridge
    • the Aboriginal Day of Mourning

 

  • outline the main features and/or developments of the chosen event
  • explain the significance of the event to Australian history

Section D: Political Development

  • the significance of ONE of the following for Australia’s political development:
    • compulsory and preferential voting
    • founding of the Country Party
    • growth of unionism and establishment of ACTU

 

  • the significance of ONE of the following for Australia’s political development:
    • dismissal of Jack Lang
    • the responses of governments to the Great Depression

 

  • outline the main developments and/or features of the chosen study
  • assess the significance of the chosen study to Australia’s political development

Stage 5 Mandatory Course

Objectives

Students will develop:

Outcomes

A student:

a knowledge and understanding of significant developments in Australia’s social, political and cultural history

5.1

explains social, political and cultural developments and events and evaluates their impact on Australian life

a knowledge and understanding of Australia’s international relationships

5.2

assesses the impact of international events and relationships on Australia’s history

a knowledge and understanding of the changing rights and freedoms of Aboriginal peoples and other groups in Australia

5.3

explains the changing rights and freedoms of Aboriginal peoples and other groups in Australia

the skills to undertake the process of historical inquiry

5.4

sequences major historical events to show an understanding of continuity, change and causation

5.5

identifies, comprehends and evaluates historical sources

5.6

uses sources appropriately in an historical inquiry

5.7

explains different contexts, perspectives and interpretations of the past

5.8

locates, selects and organises relevant historical information from a number of sources, including ICT, to undertake historical inquiry

the skills to communicate their understanding of history

5.9

uses historical terms and concepts in appropriate contexts

5.10

selects and uses appropriate oral, written and other forms, including ICT, to communicate effectively about the past for different audiences

Sydney Harbour Bridge – Virtual Site Study

Site Studies Mandatory Courses

A site study should be integrated within each of Stages 4 and 5 as a means through which students acquire knowledge, skills, values and attitudes from experience in the field or by analysing a virtual site using ICT. Site studies enable students to understand their historical environment and participate actively in historical inquiry. They can offer a means of interpreting the past and/or recognising how human occupation and use of the site has changed over time, and lead to an understanding of the context in which changes have occurred. They also provide an enjoyable means to understand and actively engage in the past and help fashion a lifelong interest in history.

What is a site study?

A site study is an inquiry-based examination of an historically or culturally significant location. Site studies may include an investigation of the school and its surroundings or a visit to an archaeological site, a museum, an Aboriginal site (with permission), a specific building, a monument, a local area, an open-air museum or a virtual site available on CD or the internet.

Information Communication Technologies have presented teachers with opportunities to explore virtual historical and heritage site studies with their students. Virtual sites are especially valuable in teaching students how to evaluate a website or CD for usefulness and reliability as an historical source. They also offer an opportunity to teach some of the skills of investigating an historical site while still remaining within the classroom.

Teachers must identify the outcomes and objectives relevant to the site study.

The following suggestions of sites could be considered:

  • heritage buildings
  • factories or industrial sites
  • memorials
  • statues
  • Aboriginal sites
  • Museums
  • National Parks and Historic Sites
  • monuments
  • the school and its grounds
  • cemeteries
  • churches and places of worship
  • bridges
  • railways and tramways
  • public buildings
  • private homes of heritage value
  • archaeological sites
  • Parliament House
  • Australian War Memorial
  • streets and streetscapes
  • suburbs, towns and villages
  • natural environments
  • shops and business districts
  • farms and properties
  • virtual sites.
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